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under control, but does he think the debt ceiling is the leverage that republicans should use to get that done? he'll join us exclusively, and i know you're going to ask him about that. >> absolutely. >> let's check out the action on the street right here. here's how things are shaping up with less than an hour to go. the dow jones industrial average hitting basically at the highs of the day. had been down around 60 points earlier. talking about a gain of 20 points on the blue chip average. fractional move at 13,527. nasdaq chart pattern looks similar. take a look though it's negative. down about nine points on the nasdaq, a quarter points lower and the s&p 500 looks like this. similar chart pattern as the dow up a fraction on the standard & poor's but still that's the high of the afternoon. let's get more on the markets in today's "closing bell" exchange by hank smith and steve from comcast funds and our own rick santelli. >> hello. >> good to see you guys. >> thank you so much for joining us. >> hank smith, we haven't heard from you in a while. let me kick this off with you. how ar
the sequestered, the debt ceiling, and you have the continuing resolution. the sequestered and debt ceiling fall on top of each other towards the end of february. these to say and republican leadership and the senate, which is served in for 12 years, you never take a hostage you cannot shoot. the problem with the house was they took hostage the cannot shoot when they took the fiscal cliff. if the republican members of congress take the debt ceiling as a hostage, it is a hostage you cannot shoot. as a very practical matter, if we go over the debt ceiling, we do not increase the debt ceiling, republicans will not win the debate. they will argue they are not increasing it because they do not want to control spending but they will not win the debate. what will happen is the white house will pay with cash flow of the interest on the debt. the debt will not be called. what they might not pay our social security checks. the moment the american citizen figures out they may not go out, the game is over. tenfold. because believe me, though congress can stand up to the senior lobby. so that is not a legiti
there not be crisis after crisis dealing with the debt ceiling. >> you said last night, you've got to put on a yogi bear costume to make sense of it. >> returning a lot to shareholders. >> one wonders. >> $12 million they're talking about. >> they have been increasing, of course, ever since the huge cuts that had to take place. what is it going to be now, four years ago, right? >> that period, $6. >> yeah. >> march of '09. amazing, coming up on the four-year anniversary. >> do you ever worry about your paycheck? >> yeah. i think you worry about money you had in any bank account or anything. sure. ge was to cushifocused in the ff '08, that was the moment where it could all come to -- >> that was after the ge bailout. >> sorry, not to revisit the -- >> we have to remind people where we came from. tim geithner leaving, david faber is worried about his paycheck. >> speaking of paychecks, let's talk morgan stanley. wall street firm reporting fourth quarter earnings 45 earlier on squawk, james gorman said his firm is poised to improved market environment. which shows a lot of promise if uncertainty is re
. and number two, i think it is fido, as the president said so clearly yesterday, that the debt ceiling essentially must not use to say what then that essentially takes on and essentially undoes the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president made so clear what would he have staked if that were to happen and i just think it's so critical that not occur. you know, i've been through these battles as i've said for many decades, but i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff in terms of the full faith and credit of the united states. the consequences with teeth, i think, to not take, potentially cataclysmic. and for the republicans who essentially say, let's do it, i think that would be a very, very serious mistake with foreseeable consequences. the federal reserve has said don't do it and i think the responsible position is we should not flirt with it. >> said they don't march on me with torches that they start asking you questions. something cataclysmic shouldn't be done in terms of reaching the debt ceiling, yet does science seem
the debt ceiling in a timely manner and providing more clarity on policies could actually generate a boost in confidence and open the door for faster growth in the second half of 2013. looking at the labor market, we see lackluster growth in 2013 wing on job creation. we actually see gains of slowing in the first half of 2013 before picking up. it is a little bit slower than in the 4 1/4 with the doctrines of around 50,000 per month. slower gdp growth is going to be driven, we think, by a consumer that is going to be hobbled by tax increases. we will remain positive in 2013 combined -- in 2013, but not appositive in consumer spending over the fourth quarter the second half will be particularly weighed down by less money in their paychecks. and we think as the year progresses, the strength of the housing market, the while the effects of the home price gains and perhaps to improvement in housing could lead to somewhat stronger consumer spending. we did see a 12% gain in housing starts this morning month over month. 37% year over year. these are strong numbers. we did see improvement in home
that is failing to agree on increasing the debt ceiling on time and prior to that preferably and reaching agreement on medium-term debt reduction. that i mentioned earlier. for the nonadvanced economies, and i'm putting together the emerging markets as well as the low income countries, clearly those countries are faring at a much better pace in terms of growth. but everywhere i've traveled in the last two months in africa, in latin america and in asia there's always been a concern about the unbalances and the lack of decisive action to address the advanced economies' crisis. so this spillover effect including in terms of confidence building are clear. and given those, this increasing interconnectedness -- particularly with certain markets -- reducing this uncertainty is going to be key to the health of the global economy and to a lot of those regions that are still very dynamic to continue to grow at a pace that is sustainable and necessary for the well being of their population. this is excessively too general because when you go down the list of the emerging market economies and the low
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6